Wednesday, 1 October 2014

Lighter Footprints Pre-election Forum

Wed November 12 at 7 pm
Hawthorn Arts Centre (formerly Town Hall)
360 Burwood Rd Hawthorn

Main parties have been invited to discuss what they propose as climate change policy ahead of the state election. Independent experts will also be part of the evening.

Come to hear local candidates from Kew, Hawthorn, Burwood and Box Hill, and ask questions, especially if you are from these seats.

Further information


041 1115 186


Wednesday, 17 September 2014

Meeting Wednesday 24 September





7pm for 7.30 pm start
Guide Hall 
Faversham Rd
Canterbury

"Doing Climate Politics:
Insights into Political Processes"

Guest speaker: Dr Ken Coghill


Ken will lead a discussion of how politicians and political parties relate to the community on climate change.

Tuesday, 19 August 2014

August 27 Lighter Footprints Meeting




 Wed August 27 
7 for 7.30 pm
Guide Hall Faversham Rd
Canterbury

  Conversations with our local community. 

We will be having a discussion with two members of Borderlands about what could be an on-going basis for working with others in our local community, or just amongst our own members, to raise awareness and involvement with the climate change movement. 

One of our agreements made at our strategic planning day was that we should pursue stronger connections with our local community. We would try to build links with other community groups who would be likely to share our concern for the natural environment and build the growing concern at the impact of carbon emissions on our world. This may include groups like churches, environment protection groups, and gardening groups, possibly Rotary and Probus groups and local Oxfam and Getup groups and the like. 

With this in mind, how do we begin these conversations, with whom, and what do they look like? What is it we want to say and how do we hear what it is that they want us to hear?
At our next LF meeting we will join with two people from Borderlands, Jacques and Jenni, to frame ways forward. They will lead us in small groups to process some of the leading questions that drive that discussion. There are likely to be opportunities to explore this further in the future but this session is for us to propose what we can do next  as well as how we might engage with the Borderlands project from here. This offers a potential for working alongside others in building  a grass roots action. 
Lighter Footprints has on its website this quote from George Monbiot
"The real issues are not technical or economic. The crisis we face demands a profound philosophical discussion, a reappraisal of who we are and what progress means. Debating these matters makes us neither saints nor communists; it shows only that we have understood the science." (http://www.monbiot.com/2007/12/04/what-is-progress/)
It is looking at some of these matters of concern - the subject of profound philosophical discussion - that we hope to foster through this process

Further information 
Carolyn Ingvarson
0411 115 186



Wednesday, 23 July 2014

Next Lighter Footprints Meeting Wed 30 July



"Local Government and Sustainability"

What's going on and what can we do.


Wednesday 30th July
7 for 7.30 pm
Guide Hall - 1 Faversham Rd 
Canterbury

Speakers from Boroondara Council, and group discussion 


Everyone welcome 
Food and drinks available 
Gold coin donation. 
More Information 0411 115 186

Sunday, 6 July 2014

Community delegation to Canberra to say "Dont drop the ball on the climate laws"



On June 19, the ACF organised a delegation of community representatives from each of the states to visit Canberra with the petition to hold onto the climate laws - all of the -which had been signed by 2  35,000 people. 
We met with several politicians and left information related to the purpose of the delegation with many more. 
Here is a two minute video which captures something of the purpose of the visit, and although it is done in a fun way, it was a serious message. 


This is the delegation
 Here we are in Josh Frydenburg's office

Thursday, 26 June 2014

Australian Climate Action Summit -- Brisbane 19 -21 September


Please consider the following information about the upcoming summit in Brisbane.

It's time for climate solutions....
It’s getting to that time of year again when we come together and inspire the climate movement to keep pushing for progress!

They say that the hour is darkest before the dawn, and what better place to bring on the dawn than the sun state.

In 2014 the Australian Climate Action Summit will be held 
Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane from the 19th-21st of September. 

The Summit will cover the two full days of the weekend with presentations, workshops, networking and open space sessions on a range of key topics. On the Friday evening a Public Forum will be held featuring youth challenging our rights over their future.
Find out about early-bird registrations by subscribing to the summit email updates!

The summit will help to write the new narrative of innovative and regenerative solutions to move beyond the “business as usual” response to climate change. It will be held at the beautiful Gardens Point campus situated in Brisbane’s city centre alongside the City Botanic Gardens and the Brisbane River.

We will be contacting you again soon with more information about the summit and how you can submit program proposals. In the mean time please see a short summary of the program plan we are envisioning below.

Keep up all the good work and we hope to see you in September.

Regards,

The Australian Climate Action Summit 2014 Organising Committee,

The Summit Program Streams
This year’s Summit is branching out,  with 4 streams providing options for nurturing via head, heart or hands, wherever you are in your climate change journey:
  • Brain food – get your facts fix – climate and science updates, major national campaigns and plans from the big NGOs and grassroots networks.
  • Let’s do it! Get your hands-on training in media management, non-violent direct action, ‘democracy school’, Transition training, divestment from fossil fuels, Gas Free Communities…
  • Can we talk?  Learn how to have those difficult but meaningful conversations across the political divides, within the family, at work, at play/sport and in business. With real insights, tips and practice.
  • Heart and soul: Repair from despair! Do something for your inner activist with a range of fabulous workshops, films, music, performance and art. This includes the “Cut the crap” – stand up climate comedy competition, with local and well known comedians.
-- 
Ahri Tallon
Australian Climate Action Summit 2014- Brisbane, 19th-21st September
Media and Communications Coordinator
M: 0423 515 941
S: ahritallon
Sign up for updates about the summit-  sign up form 
Like us on facebook here
Wherever we walk in Australia, we walk on Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander land.
´¯`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.¸><((((º>
`·.¸¸..·´¯`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.¸><((((º>

Tuesday, 17 June 2014

The Age,  16 June 2014



 The Age,  16 June 2014

Monday, 2 June 2014

Here is the start of the Obama approach - with EPA legislation.


EPA to propose cutting emissions from coal plants
The Washington PostSunday, June 1, 2014 5:47:51 PM

News Alert

EPA to propose cutting emissions from coal plants

Advertisement
The Environmental Protection Agency will propose a regulation Monday that will cut carbon-dioxide emissions from existing coal plants by 30 percent by 2030, according to individuals who have been briefed on the plan.

The rule represents one of the most significant steps the federal government has ever taken to curb the nation’s greenhouse-gas emissions, which are linked to climate change. The proposal is sure to spark a major political and legal battle.

Read more at:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/epa-to-propose-cutting-carbon-dioxide-emissions-from-coal-plants-30percent-by-2030/2014/06/01/f5055d94-e9a8-11e3-9f5c-9075d5508f0a_story.html 

Sunday, 1 June 2014

Obama makes a strong stance on climate change; Why is the Bonn meeting important?

Two useful pieces of information:
1. A summary of the US stance on climate change as announced by Obama.This has been put together by the Climate Institute.
2.  Laura Kelly from CANA adds some commentary about the Bonn meeting in June.
Both of these issues need to be more widely covered so please pass them on.

United States steps up action on climate change

On Monday 2 June  United States President Barack Obama is expected to announce new rules to reduce carbon pollution from American coal and gas power plants. It’s the latest effort by the world’s largest economy and second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases to make significant cuts in its carbon emissions.

The new rules will add to existing federal regulations, state-based carbon pricing and renewable energy investment which have helped US emissions fall 10 per cent since 2005. Nonetheless, rising gas prices have driven increased use of coal-fired power, resulting in a 2.4 per cent increase in emissions from energy use over the last year.[i]These actions and others in the pipeline are necessary to put the US on track to achieve its target to cut national emissions by 17 per cent from 2005 levels by 2020.

Obama uses regulation to cut fossil fuel emissions
The Obama Administration is making progress on the national Climate Action Plan the White House launched last year, which includes development of the following[ii]:
+        Next week’s proposed emission limits on existing fossil fuel power plants, currently producing one-third of total U.S. emissions. These limits are expected to reduce carbon pollution from more than 1000 coal and gas generators while allowing states to develop their own strategy to achieve this goal. For example, emissions may be avoided through energy efficiency and renewable energy. The rules are to be finalised within a year, and states have a further year to develop their strategies.
+        Emission limits on new coal and gas plant, which will require any new coal generators to include carbon capture and storage. These rules will be finalised in January 2015, but will apply to any construction starting after the date of proposal (September 2013).[iii]
+        Stronger regulation to reduce methane emissions (25 times more potent than carbon dioxide) from oil and gas production
+        Emission standards for heavy trucks—responsible for 20 per cent of American transport emissions—for implementation by 2018.
+        Reducing the use of super-potent hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) through regulation and developing climate-friendly substitutes in air conditioning, refrigeration and other uses.
+        Strengthening energy efficiency standards for equipment and buildings
+        Requiring all federal agencies to source 20 per cent of their electricity from renewables by 2020. The federal government, the single largest energy consumer in the US, has already cut its emissions by 15 per cent since 2008.
These actions build on earlier efforts, including rising emission standards for passenger vehicles and light trucks, tax credits for renewable energy and stimulus spending that financed more than $90 billion in clean energy investments.[iv]

Renewable energy is a booming industry
Twenty-nine U.S. states have mandatory renewable energy targets, while another eight have voluntary targets. Twenty have binding energy efficiency targets. These, combined with private sector investment in new areas like solar panel leasing, electric vehicles, smart grids and electricity storage, are driving growth in renewable electricity production, clean technologies and energy efficiency.

For example, in 2013 the U.S. added more than 4.7 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic capacity, a 41 per cent increase over the previous year (and about 1.5 times Australia’s total solar PV capacity).[v] In the past five years, wind and solar power use has more than doubled; renewables now contribute 13 per cent of U.S. electricity.[vi]  With a new home installing solar panels every four minutes, solar jobs have risen to 120,000, nearly a quarter of an estimated 600,000 renewable energy jobs. Energy efficiency services employ another 380,000 Americans.[vii]

Carbon markets gather momentum
Nine northeastern states are members of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), a cap-and-trade system that limits electricity emissions. Since it began in 2005 the RGGI has reduced electricity emissions by 40 per cent and raised $1.5 billion, which is used for renewable energy programs, assisting consumers with power bills and adding to states’ general funds. In January 2014 the RGGI tightened the limit on emissions by 45 per cent, which has increased permit prices by one-third—from $US3 to $US4 per tonne (no permits are provided free).

California, the world’s eighth largest economy, launched its emission trading scheme in January 2013, and this year linked it with the ETS operating in Quebec, Canada. Californian carbon prices average about $US11.50.

New federal rules for power plant emissions are expected to spur more states to explore carbon trading to meet their obligations at lowest cost.

Military prepare for climate ‘conflict catalyst’
The defence establishment is sounding alarms about the security risks of climate change. The Pentagon’s Quadrennial Defense Review 2014 warns climate change is a “catalyst of conflict” that aggravates global instability and puts greater demands on military operations and military facilities.[viii]

The military has also put significant efforts into reducing its own emissions. It is researching advanced biofuels, improving its energy efficiency and installing renewable energy at military bases. These moves also reduce costs and improve energy security, particularly in environments where fuel transport can put troops in danger.[ix] 

A powerful minority resists climate action
Polling results show a majority of Republican and Democrat voters support reducing fossil fuel use and increasing renewable energy.[x] [xi] [xii] Threats to energy and mining interests and ideological opposition to government intervention mean much of the US Congress, members of fossil fuel industries and a number of coal-reliant states oppose climate action. Groups like the American Legislative Exchange Council are working to unwind states’ renewable energy targets.[xiii] 

Table 1. Recent U.S. climate developments 
January
The US Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (comprising nine northeast states) tightens limits on its cap-and-trade program by 45 per cent

California formally links its carbon market with that of Canada’s Quebec province.

February
United States and China agree on workplans for their five joint initiatives (vehicle emissions, smart grids, carbon capture utilisation and storage, managing emissions data, energy efficiency in buildings and industry). The plans identify specific agencies in each country to lead various tasks, as well as deadlines for each task. They also agree to share information on new post-2020 emission targets due internationally by April 2015.

Obama Administration launches seven "climate hubs" to help farmers and rural communities adapt to the impacts of climate change.

Investors including the New York State Comptroller, with combined assets of over $200 billion, file shareholder resolutions requiring ten energy companies such as Exxon Mobil to disclose their exposure to constraints on carbon emissions.

President Obama directs federal agencies to develop higher fuel standards for medium-sized and heavy trucks by March 2016. Heavy-duty vehicles are responsible for about a quarter of the carbon emissions from U.S. road transport.

Massachusetts requires a new gas-fired power plant to meet declining emissions limits and set a date for plant retirement as conditions of construction.

Colorado becomes the first state to require oil and gas companies to control or capture 95 per cent of their emissions.

March
President Obama announces a $US1 billion fund to boost resilience to climate change through helping coastal communities at risk of storm flooding, researching sea-level rise and boosting buildings’ energy efficiency.

US EPA announces plan to phase down the use of high-emission HFCs in vehicle air conditioning, commercial refrigeration, plastic foam products and aerosols.

Obama Administration releases its methane reduction strategy, which includes strengthening regulations of emissions from oil and gas production.

April
United States, China and the European Union agree to cooperate on the global emissions reduction agreement to be finalised in 2015.

New York announces $US1 billion in incentives for solar PV systems through to 2023 to expand the state’s solar energy industry.

US Energy Department announces energy-efficiency standards for certain light bulbs will increase by 13 per cent over current levels.

May
White House releases National Climate Assessment, an expert report on the current and future impacts of climate change on the United States.

June
US EPA proposes standards to reduce emissions from existing fossil fuelled power plants



Table 2. Comparison of United States and Australia

United States of America
Australia
% global emissions
15.3
1.3
Per capita emissions
(t CO2-e)
21.2
25.1
GDP (int. $ PPP) per capita
$51,749
$43, 818
Emission targets –  2020
~17% reduction by 2020 on 2005 levels
(~21% reduction on 2000 levels)
5-25% reduction by 2020 on 2000 levels
(10-30% reduction on 2005 levels)
Legal status
Voluntary international commitment
(20 states and DC have emission targets)
Binding domestic legislation and binding international commitment
Carbon price
Regional/state-based emissions trading. California (trading at ~$US11.50/tonne) and Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island and Vermont (trading at ~$4/tonne). California has linked with the Quebec market.
Government plans to repeal national carbon price of $24 covering ~66% of domestic emissions and legislation to transition to an emission trading scheme in 2015. Proposed replacement mechanisms still under development.
Renewable energy target
Federal tax credits for renewable energy (29 states have binding renewable energy targets)
Government is reviewing the Renewable Energy Target of at least 41,000 GWh by 2020 (~22-26% electricity by 2020)

Energy efficiency targets

Federal target to double energy productivity by 2030; commercial and residential building codes. 22 states have their own efficiency energy targets
National appliance and building standards; reporting requirements for largest energy users (Energy Efficiency Opportunities program) are set to be repealed by the government. State-based energy efficiency targets in NSW, Vic and SA. Victoria is terminating its scheme in 2015.
Emission standards
Mandatory passenger vehicle efficiency standards (147 gCO2/km by 2017 – currently   228 gCO2/km)

New fossil fuel fired power plants can emit no more than 455kg CO2/MWh (~no more than gas-fired plant). State-based power standards already exist in California, Oregon, Washington, Montana and Illinois.
Voluntary passenger vehicle efficiency standards (222 gCO2/km)
Land sector policies
Several initiatives at subnational level, notably a land sector offsets scheme in the Californian emissions trading scheme.
Carbon offset scheme (Carbon Farming Initiative)



From: canachat-bounces@cana.net.au [mailto:canachat-bounces@cana.net.auOn Behalf Of Laura Kelly
Sent: Friday, 30 May 2014 12:19 PM
To: canachat@cana.net.au
Subject: [CANAchat] Some coverage of international developments


Dear all,

The Bonn climate talks are next week and on Monday, Obama will unveil his plan to cut US carbon pollution. This is something we should push coverage of here, and I'll be following up with groups planning media to ask them to share their top-line messaging and media releases to CANAchat.

Below are some stories on Obama's plan and the role of the Bonn climate talks. Australia will not be sending Bishop to Bonn and will again send ambassador Dr Justin Lee. There are also stories below on agreements around the Green Climate Fund - the infrastructure has basically been signed off, to allow countries to begin pledging funds to it. And Mexico joining an increasing group of countries including India, China on increased RE pledges. 


Obama to unveil historic climate change plan to cut US carbon pollution

• Proposed regulations could cut carbon pollution by up to 25%
• President still faces potential opposition from Republicans

·  Suzanne Goldenberg, US environment correspondent

·  theguardian.com, Thursday 29 May 2014 21.11 BST

 

 

President Barack Obama will unveil a plan on Monday that will cut carbon pollution from power plants and promote cap-and-trade, undertaking the most significant action on climate change in American history.

The proposed regulations Obama will launch at the White House on Monday could cut carbon pollution by as much as 25% from about 1,600 power plants in operation today, according to those claiming familiarity with the plan.
Power plants are the country's single biggest source of carbon pollution – responsible for up to 40% of the country's emissions.

Why do next week’s UN climate talks in Bonn matter?

Last updated on 26 May 2014, 4:09 pm

Few announcements expected, but meeting offers opportunity to build relationships ahead of Ban Ki-moon summit

Kishan Kumarsingh and Artur Runge-Metzger are set to have a tough time chairing talks in Bonn (Pic: IISD)

Kishan Kumarsingh and Artur Runge-Metzger are set to have a tough time chairing talks in Bonn (Pic: IISD)

Coming off the back of the Abu Dhabi Ascent, and the jubilation at the recently announced agreement in the Green Climate Fund (GCF) meeting, Bonn looks to be just another stage post en route to Paris in 2015.
But the Bonn intercessional this June is more than just a normal negotiation.  Ministers have no sooner disembarked from their transportation out of the luxury oasis of the desert, to step back in it to reach the not so glamorous Maritim Hotel, Bonn.

UN’s Green Climate Fund ‘ready’ to start work

Last updated on 22 May 2014, 11:39 am
Board agree eight essential requirements, meaning GCF is now ready to start accepting funds from donors

 

By Ed King
The UN’s flagship climate fund could start investing in clean energy projects as early as 2015 after its board agreed how it will operate and who it will work with.
Four intense days of discussion in Songdo, South Korea ended in agreement by the 24-strong board on eight ‘essential requirements’ for the fund to come online.
These included safeguards to ensure it makes socially and environmentally sound investments, together with guidelines on who can distribute money from the GCF, and how much control countries will have over projects it backs.
Speaking from Songdo, Marcela Jamarillo, a climate finance expert from the London-based E3G thinktank, said the meeting had broadly been a success.
“The fund is ready – it has the basic elements. There is a lot of work to do in the details ahead of the next board meeting in October, but I think it is ready for those pledges to start coming in,” she said.

Gland, Switzerland: Mexico’s plans to increase its renewable energy supply from 15% to 25% of total electricity by 2018, sets the pace globally for a much needed increased ambition towards the UN climate negotiations in Lima, Peru later this year, according to WWF.

Mexico´s Energy Secretary Pedro Joaquín Coldwell today announced new renewable energy targets for President Peña Nieto’s 2013-2018 Administration. This means almost doubling the electricity output to 80 TWh by 2018 coming from renewable sources, which would reduce about 15% of emissions from the power sector, according to WWF´s preliminary estimations. 

 

This follows Renew Economy's reports of increased wind and solar targets in China:

The South China Morning Post reported that a circular issued late last week by the National Development and Reform Commission set a goal of 150 gigawatts (GW) for wind power capacity and 70GW for solar capacity by 2017.
This is part of a new target to lift the non-fossil fuel supply to 13 per cent of total energy consumption. It was 9.8 per cent. 

Laura Kelly

Director

Climate Action Network Australia

P: 0401 559 335.